Camilla Seale headshot.JPG

CAMILLA

  • LSE: MSc Inequalities and Social Science
  • University of Cambridge: BA Hons English, 1st
  • North London Collegiate School: A-Levels: History A*, Theatre Studies A*, Government & Politics A

BIOGRAPHY & INTERESTS

I grew up in Muswell Hill in London where I attended North London Collegiate School. When I applied for my undergraduate, I was lucky enough to know exactly what I wanted to study, thanks to some fantastic humanities teachers at my school. I read English at Girton College, Cambridge where I received a first, focusing in particular on American literature, Vladimir Nabokov’s early novels and Dylan Thomas’ poetry. Much of my thinking while there was influenced by my relationship to classical singing and to theatre, which was what I spent the rest of my time doing. After graduation I undertook an internship in the theatre department of the literary agency Casarotto Ramsay & Associates, discovered it wasn’t for me and went as an au pair to Berlin where I became fluent in German and taught German children English. I am now undertaking an MSc in Inequalities and Social Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science and continue to develop my singing and long term theatre-going habit in my spare time.

EXPERIENCE & APPROACH

My mentoring experience has been focused on teaching English to non-native speakers in Germany and leading supervisions with first year undergraduates in practical criticism of literature at Cambridge. At the advanced level, I aim to focus my mentoring on becoming comfortable with the process of analysing texts and constructing arguments from different angles. By providing students with the tools to tackle problems and questions in a flexible way, I hope to inspire confidence which goes beyond the immediate task at hand and can be applied in different contexts, across the humanities. Faced with entrance exams or university interviews nothing is more empowering than knowing that you understand what is being asked for and how to get there. At the 11+ and GCSE level, I aim to do this by breaking down big problems into smaller pieces that follow a logical, cumulative order. Whether it’s probability of Shakespeare, I find that there’s nothing better than a one-to-one mentoring context to be able to go at the student’s own pace and pick them up in their lives where they are.